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July 30, 2010

Axiom Launches M3 and VP100 In-Wall Speakers

Filed under: What's New — Tags: , , , , — Amie C @ 1:00 am
M3 In Wall Speakers

Expanding our popular line of in-wall audiophile-quality speakers that virtually disappear within a room, Axiom is proud to announce the arrival of the M3 in-wall speaker and the VP100 in-wall center speaker, perfectly tuned for medium-sized media rooms, living rooms, dens, and bedrooms.

Building from the exceptional M3 bookshelves, the $330 in-wall M3 offers the same detail and imaging, producing the kind of sound that lets you feel a soundtrack, not just hear it. This is an all-around speaker and an excellent choice if you are starting your home theater off without a subwoofer.

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July 9, 2010

Question of the Month: Why 4-Ohm Impedance?

Filed under: Question of the Month — Tags: , — Alan @ 12:10 am

Q. What are the advantages of 4-ohm speakers? Why did Axiom choose an impedance of 4 ohms instead of 8 ohms for the M80s? – T.M.

A. Impedance is complicated and frequently misunderstood. A speaker designer doesn’t “choose” speaker impedance. The overall impedance is dictated by the number of drivers and the crossovers. It is an electrical characteristic that reflects the total current draw of all the wire in the voice coil of each driver plus the two crossovers (for the M80). You will find most very large tower speakers like Axiom’s M80, which has six drivers, will typically have around 4 ohms impedance. Other smaller speakers typically have 8-ohm impedances because they use only two drivers and one crossover.

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July 7, 2010

A/V Tip of the Month: Loudspeaker Tonal Balance

A recent newcomer’s post on Axiom’s forums raised the question of loudspeaker tonal balance, specifically the relative “sound” of Axiom’s M22 versus the M3 bookshelf speakers.

My answer pointed out that the M3 gave the impression of having more bass output than the M22, partly because of the M3’s bass hump around 100 Hz. Another forum regular (Jakewash) gave another reason for the M3’s bass sounding more prominent, noting:

“The difference is whether or not you like your midrange sound equal/upfront to the bass (M22) or laid back (M3). The M3 actually has a midrange dip that makes the upper bass sound more prominent than the midrange giving the illusion of more bass when in fact it is less midrange.”

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July 5, 2010

Redefining The Center Channel: Axiom’s Research Lab Releases the VP180

Filed under: What's New — Tags: , , , — Alan @ 12:10 am

At Axiom, we’ve been researching different driver arrays and enclosure designs for center channel speakers, following up with double-blind listening tests, and we’re now ready to announce the new VP180, a definitive no-compromise center channel that delivers the same extended deep bass, tonal neutrality and spatial transparency as Axiom’s critically acclaimed M80 and M60 tower speakers.

VP180 Center Channel with Dual Custom Aluminum Stands

VP180 Center Channel with Dual Custom Aluminum Stands

The VP180 uses six drivers: two 6.5-inch aluminum-cone woofers, two 5.25-inch aluminum midranges, and two 1-inch titanium dome tweeters in a horizontal array arrived at after months of listening tests to music and dialogue program sources, on- and off-axis.

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