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January 22, 2014

Speaker Placement Series Part 1

Filed under: Audio Knowledge — Tags: , , — Andrew Welker @ 2:09 pm

Today we’re going to start a series of videos that covers the basics of loudspeaker placement and set up, and it’s going to be heavily driven by your input and questions that you have. On our forums under the “What’s New” section, you’ll see a thread that I started a few days ago that asks for input on what questions that you want answered, no matter how simple: we really want to cover off topics that you’re interested in or wondering about. Please post any suggestions there, or in the comments below. (Note: please pardon the sound of the dust collector in the background – hazard of having our offices attached to our factory!)

Today we’re going to start off with some basics of bookshelves and center channels. One of the biggest mistakes people make when they place a bookshelf speaker or center channel on a shelf is that they bury them in the cabinet. A lot of times this is for aesthetic reasons, but acoustically it’s pretty much one of the worst things that you can do.

What will happen with a speaker even an inch or two behind the front edge of the shelf, it will create reflections that will muffle the sound or destroy the image. You’ll get a very colored sound quality from your center channel or your bookshelf speaker.

What you want to do is make sure the speaker is sitting as flush as possible or proud of the front edge of the shelf in the cabinet. This will give you far better acoustic performance.

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December 24, 2013

When Should You Use Port Plugs?

Filed under: Audio Knowledge,How-To — Tags: , , — Andrew Welker @ 8:41 am

We have recently started shipping our newest product, the M100 Floorstanding Speaker, which is the first model of ours to come with port plugs. A port plug, as its name suggests, is simply something that will plug one of the loudspeaker ports, keeping air from moving in and out of the cabinet.

There are a number of reasons why you might want to use these, and they are going to be offered on the website as an accessory, so I’ll also cover where you might want to use these other than for the model M100.

When you place a loudspeaker in a room, if it has to be close to anything called a room boundary (back walls, side walls), you get something called boundary reinforcement happening. Boundary reinforcement will tend to accentuate the mid-bass frequencies. In a speaker like the M100 that has very good low frequency extension and output capabilities, you can easily end up with ‘too much of a good thing’ in those environments. And if you’re in a small listening room or environment, you can find that because everything is closer to the boundaries that you’ll also get that midbass accentuation, which can be too much of a good thing and can actually make things sound really slow and congested.

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November 26, 2013

What To Get Home Theater Lovers For The Holidays

Filed under: Audio Knowledge — Amie C @ 5:53 pm

It happens every year, doesn’t it? You get asked what you want for the holidays and your mind goes blank. Deer-in-headlights looks ensue, followed by a sheepish shrug, and then . . . the unmistakable disappointment of yet another tool or tie waiting for you . . .

Don’t worry – we’ve got you covered!  Just print out this handy 5.1 Audiophile and Movie Buff Gift Guide, circle the one you really want, and leave it out conspicuously!  You’re sure to get something you love this year.

Beatles Vinyl Collection1.  The Beatles In Stereo Vinyl Box

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October 25, 2013

Positioning Omnidirectional Speakers

Filed under: Audio Knowledge — Tags: — Amie C @ 1:01 pm

Andrew Welker: In this video we’re going to discuss positioning our LFR1100 omnidirectional speakers – both placement and how to wire them up; in particular, some of the settings on the DSP unit.

 As many of you know the LFR1100 is omnidirectional, and that just means it radiates sound in 360 degrees – in all directions. To achieve that, there is a complement of drive units – two midranges and two tweeters – on the back. Because of that, the relative placement of the LFR1100 to the back wall, and the angle at which you’ve got it to the back wall, influences the soundstage, and the way that the sound is going to blend at the listening position.

So one of the things that we recommend – if at all possible – is to allow a couple of feet from the rear of the speaker to the back wall. In this setup here, it’s about 2 feet. If however you need to get the speaker closer than that, there is a boundary compensation switch on the back of the unit.

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