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#366140 - 02/09/12 04:48 PM Re: In-Cabinet VP160 [Re: CatBrat]
SBrown Offline
aficionado

Registered: 11/16/10
Posts: 901
Loc: Victoria,BC
I think it would be safer to run 14 ohms than 3.5 ohms. I would NOT want to fry my amp. I just need to be sure before I mess with it.

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#366149 - 02/09/12 07:54 PM Re: In-Cabinet VP160 [Re: CatBrat]
dakkon Offline
connoisseur

Registered: 02/08/04
Posts: 1863
Originally Posted By: CatBrat
Series = 14 ohms.
Parallel = 3.43 ohms. (Note: 2 8ohm parallel = 4 ohm).

Calculation follows:

vp150 = 6 ohms
vp160 = 8 ohms

To calculate Series, it's total ohms
6 + 8 = 14 ohms.

To calculate Parallel, it's done this way:
1 / (1/6) + (1/8)
= 1 / (4/24) + (3/24)
= 1 / (7/24)
= 1 / .2916
= 3.43 ohms.


(I've been running my center M2 + VP150 at 3.43 ohm with a Pioneer Elite for months with no problem.)


Just to add, this is calculating nominal impedance, when you start applying an AC sign wave i.e. Music, the resistance's will change, and could result in a lower than the nominal calculated value... I would not hook any speaker or speaker circuit (which you would be doing by wiring the 150+160 in parallel) to a receiver, you would need a pretty beefy amp to handel that load...

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#366164 - 02/09/12 11:19 PM Re: In-Cabinet VP160 [Re: SBrown]
JohnK Offline
shareholder in the making

Registered: 05/11/02
Posts: 10644
Shawn, the calculation for parallel impedances is as Brian illustrated(the sum of the reciprocals of the individual impedances equals the reciprocal of the combined impedance), using the rated numbers of 6 and 8 ohms. Of course those numbers for impedance are simply an approximate rating and they vary greatly with frequency. In any case, impedance is rarely a real problem with equipment of reasonable quality and shouldn't lead to overheating and shut down at typical sound levels. It's unlikely that the parallel connection would cause a significant problem with your Onkyo and the assumption at this point should be that it'll work satisfactorily.
_________________________
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Enjoy the music, not the equipment.



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#366168 - 02/10/12 12:09 AM Re: In-Cabinet VP160 [Re: JohnK]
SBrown Offline
aficionado

Registered: 11/16/10
Posts: 901
Loc: Victoria,BC
OK,good to know! Thanks for the info guys.

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#366175 - 02/10/12 01:50 AM Re: In-Cabinet VP160 [Re: CatBrat]
dakkon Offline
connoisseur

Registered: 02/08/04
Posts: 1863
Shawn, your amp may be able to power it, but be careful how loud you play it... if your Onkyo can handel a 4 ohm load, it "should" be able to handel that load.... However, if you wind up driving the amp into thermal protection, i would change to a series set up..

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#366177 - 02/10/12 02:40 AM Re: In-Cabinet VP160 [Re: dakkon]
JohnK Offline
shareholder in the making

Registered: 05/11/02
Posts: 10644
Running speakers in series(at least if they're not identical)is generally a bad idea; for example, see discussion here . In practice, the problems caused may or may not be audible, but this should be used as a last resort, and is unlikely to be necessary, as mentioned above.
_________________________
-----------------------------------

Enjoy the music, not the equipment.



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#366185 - 02/10/12 08:54 AM Re: In-Cabinet VP160 [Re: CatBrat]
CatBrat Offline
axiomite

Registered: 08/05/09
Posts: 6015
Loc: Milky Way Galaxy
I run my 2 8 ohms (4 ohm) on L an R and used to run my 8 and 6 ohms (3.43 ohm) on Center. The Pioneer Elite never got hot, even at loud listening levels. Warm yes, but not hot.

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#366188 - 02/10/12 08:59 AM Re: In-Cabinet VP160 [Re: dakkon]
Murph Offline
axiomite

Registered: 10/05/06
Posts: 6955
Loc: PEI, Canada
Originally Posted By: dakkon
murph, a hard 90 would cause problems with the air flow... air doesn't like to do sharp 90 degree bends, if you were to put a 90 in there it would greatly reduce the CFM rating of his HVAC system... this is probably the reason for the custom part, maintain the CFM rating with non-standard parts... you will need the same overall volume inside the duct, with a non-standard shape....


I believe this is the reason for the "custom" work...


Yes, that's why I mentioned it might be the deflector driving it up. Still, I ran this scenario, pics and all, over the guy fixing the bathroom fan button hooked to our air exchange system last night and his advice was, rough quote...

"I won't criticism another professionals pricing but your friend would be smart to get two or three other quotes before settling on the job."

Hope you don't me checking with him. Just trying to be helpful.
_________________________
With great power comes Awesome irresponsibility.

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#366189 - 02/10/12 09:02 AM Re: In-Cabinet VP160 [Re: CatBrat]
CatBrat Offline
axiomite

Registered: 08/05/09
Posts: 6015
Loc: Milky Way Galaxy
Thanks. But, I'm not sure what you mean by "his advice was, rough quote."

Did he think $200 was way too much for this?

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#366194 - 02/10/12 09:40 AM Re: In-Cabinet VP160 [Re: CatBrat]
CatBrat Offline
axiomite

Registered: 08/05/09
Posts: 6015
Loc: Milky Way Galaxy
Ok, I got a price quote for the 2 custom parts for my HVAC duct renovation. It'll be $111.57 + tax. Much more reasonable than the original $200 guesstimate. Also $22 per hour for installation sounds reasonable.

I gave him the go-ahead to get the parts built.

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