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#382169 - 08/27/12 08:43 AM Re: SS Cookware? [Re: michael_d]
Ken.C Offline
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Registered: 05/03/03
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Loc: NoVA
Scott, I'm always afraid I'll warp the pan if i do that. Hearing that someone else does makes me more comfortable.
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#382174 - 08/27/12 09:30 AM Re: SS Cookware? [Re: Ken.C]
a401classic Offline
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Registered: 11/29/06
Posts: 1333
Loc: Alpharetta, GA
I'm not talking red hot or anything close, but 400-450F for sure.
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#382176 - 08/27/12 10:01 AM Re: SS Cookware? [Re: Murph]
SBrown Offline
aficionado

Registered: 11/16/10
Posts: 901
Loc: Victoria,BC
We have Lagostina SS cookware and they have no rivets. We have had them around twenty years and they still are my favorite.

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#382180 - 08/27/12 11:03 AM Re: SS Cookware? [Re: michael_d]
chesseroo Offline
axiomite

Registered: 05/13/02
Posts: 5289
Loc: western canada
Originally Posted By: michael_d
I checked out the Paderno. Not too sure about the handles. Are they comfortable enough??

You definitely have something for handles i see...
smile
I can't say i've ever used any pot that had handles so comfortable that i could flip flapjacks all day long.
That being said, the Paderno have a slightly curved but otherwise flat metal handle. If carrying a pot of boiling water over to the sink for dumping as an example, i would say the Paderno are not the most comfortable.
Maybe, 7 out of 10?

Originally Posted By: michael_d
My obsession with rivets (not) may have to be put aside. Welded handles appears to be a bit of a novelty feature that not very many offer. I'm also wondering just how robust the welds are too. They look like they are spot welded. They definitely are not welded with filler metal.

The Paderno handles won't break.
I saw a show once on "how that's made" where they had the Paderno pots.
The welds are tested at pretty high strengths.

Quote:
I know I'd prefer an edge for pouring, more so than no rivets.

The Paderno have an amazing edge for this. Best i've seen.


Quote:
If taste were the only consideration, I'd stick with good ol' cast iron. I love the way food tastes cooked in cast iron, but I just don't have the patience to deal with it. I've tried and tried, but it's a pain to clean and store. And it's heavy as hell.

We have a few.
Use them a few times a month, but not daily. Too heavy and cleaning is more of a pain.
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#382181 - 08/27/12 11:06 AM Re: SS Cookware? [Re: michael_d]
Ken.C Offline
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Registered: 05/03/03
Posts: 18044
Loc: NoVA
I use my cast iron pretty much weekly. Cleaning is no problem at all if they're properly seasoned and you have a scrubby pad.
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#382184 - 08/27/12 11:27 AM Re: SS Cookware? [Re: Ken.C]
chesseroo Offline
axiomite

Registered: 05/13/02
Posts: 5289
Loc: western canada
Originally Posted By: Ken.C
I use my cast iron pretty much weekly. Cleaning is no problem at all if they're properly seasoned and you have a scrubby pad.

We don't scrub ours.
Just wipe it out with a damp dish rag. Lightly re-oil with a paper towel and veg oil.
No rust. Blackens over time.
The last pan i bought was pre-seasoned so already pretty black. We don't' have to do much oiling with it after a wiping out.
The same process applies for our wok. It was not pre-seasoned though so we have to oil it more or it does rust around some edges.

Note that stainless steel DOES rust. It is a common misconception that it doesn't.
Stainless steel doesn't STAIN (very easily).
That being said, some grades of SS rust faster than others.
Aluminum doesn't rust.
Many SS pots have an aluminum or chromium oxide finish (i.e. a nonrusting metal blend; also good for heat transfer), but it is hard to tell exactly what the mix and blends are such that some pots could rust under simple conditions (like our wok which is SS but not oxide coated) yet others do not (like our Paderno).
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#382185 - 08/27/12 11:29 AM Re: SS Cookware? [Re: michael_d]
Ken.C Offline
shareholder in the making

Registered: 05/03/03
Posts: 18044
Loc: NoVA
Ah, cast iron, it's like religion.

I normally just wipe it out, but if there's a little stuck on, a little elbow grease with an abrasive pad (no soap!) and then rinse it out, stick it on the stove on low heat, then after a little bit wipe it down with oil.
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#382187 - 08/27/12 11:37 AM Re: SS Cookware? [Re: michael_d]
michael_d Offline
connoisseur

Registered: 07/23/04
Posts: 4249
Loc: Up yonder
Most 400 series SS alloys have a carbon component. There is also a duplex SS which is a high bread alloy with a high carbon percentage used when the strength of carbon is needed, but corrosion resistance of SS is also needed.

So not ALL SS variants rust, only those with a carbon component in the brew.

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#382189 - 08/27/12 12:16 PM Re: SS Cookware? [Re: michael_d]
chesseroo Offline
axiomite

Registered: 05/13/02
Posts: 5289
Loc: western canada
Originally Posted By: michael_d
Most 400 series SS alloys have a carbon component. There is also a duplex SS which is a high bread alloy with a high carbon percentage used when the strength of carbon is needed, but corrosion resistance of SS is also needed.

So not ALL SS variants rust, only those with a carbon component in the brew.

And kids, never try to clean carbon steel with acid.

Just saying...
smile
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#382193 - 08/27/12 12:51 PM Re: SS Cookware? [Re: Ken.C]
Murph Offline
axiomite

Registered: 10/05/06
Posts: 6955
Loc: PEI, Canada
Originally Posted By: Ken.C
Ah, cast iron, it's like religion.

I normally just wipe it out, but if there's a little stuck on, a little elbow grease with an abrasive pad (no soap!) and then rinse it out, stick it on the stove on low heat, then after a little bit wipe it down with oil.


That seems like a lot of work. My parents use a huge, cast iron frying pan that they have owned for as long as I have memories. My Dad refuses to use anything else. He even heats cans of soup in it rather than using a pot. He says it heats it up quicker when it's spread across the wider, heated surface area. He has a point there but it still looks funny.

I am quiet sure they have never applied any oils to it that were not a result of bacon frying or butter for cooking. They also wash it with dish soap every time. I know nothing about curing pots so I must assume that it is just yet another miracle of bacon.



Edited by Murph (08/27/12 12:54 PM)
Edit Reason: frying soup expansion
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